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Review Dyker Height Foot & Ankle, Brooklyn, NY

July 2022

Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Causes of Overlapping Toes

Of the many possible congenital foot problems that may manifest at some point during your life, overlapping toes are among the most common. This condition can occur when one or more toes overlap others in a seemingly permanent way. This condition most commonly involves the pinky toe, but in some cases, the big toe and the second toe might also be affected. There are several potential causes of overlapping toes to be aware of. Frequently, overlapping toes can be caused by hereditary issues. For example, you may have inherited a bone structure in your feet that makes overlapping toes more likely. Additionally, overlapping toes may be caused by the wearing of certain kinds of footwear. For instance, wearing high heels or pointy-toe shoes for prolonged periods can twist the toes into unnatural positions that may eventually lead to this condition. Other shoes that have small toe boxes can produce a similar effect. Lastly, aging can be a cause of overlapping toes. As an individual ages, their toes naturally roll in more which can lead to overlapping toes. If you believe you have overlapping toes or are at risk of developing this condition, reach out to a podiatrist. 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM of Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 19 July 2022 00:00

How Long Does a Broken Toe Take To Heal?

Breaking any bone in the body can be a serious threat to your overall health and well-being. Broken toes are no exception. Since the bones in the toes are smaller, they can be particularly vulnerable to being injured and broken. When broken, toe bones will often bleed and swell. It is common also to identify blood beneath the toenail. Breaking bones in the toes is usually extremely painful and can make walking especially difficult. Many patients will wonder how long it takes for a broken toe to heal. Although it varies depending on the patient, the injury, and the particular toe bone, there are several rules of thumb to follow. Broken big toes generally take longer to heal. After wearing a walking boot and then eventually a shoe with a stiff sole, patients can recover from broken big toes in approximately 6 to 8 weeks. Broken toes other than the big toe, commonly the pinky toe, take less time to heal. For example, after strapping and wearing shoes with stiff soles, a patient can recover from a broken pinky toe in 4 to 6 weeks. No patient wants to suffer a broken toe injury for longer than is necessary or to prolong the pain. However, it is important to let the bone take time to properly heal. Always talk with a podiatrist to ask questions about your broken toe bone and how it can be treated.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM from Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 12 July 2022 00:00

The Definition of a Plantar Fibroma

The arch of the foot is affected by a condition that is known as plantar fibroma. It is defined as an area of fibrous tissue that grows in the arch, and can cause severe pain and discomfort. It starts off as a small lump, and there may be little pain. As it grows, the pain may increase significantly, and it may be difficult to wear shoes. Research has indicated that this condition may develop from a traumatic foot injury which may tear the fascia in the arch. Additionally, there may be existing medical conditions that can contribute to the onset of a plantar fibroma. These can include diabetes, epilepsy, and long-term alcohol abuse. In severe cases, surgery may be a necessary option to remove the mass. There could be complications consisting of infection and the possibility of the fibroma returning. There is usually a simple method of discovering the fibroma, where a podiatrist will press on the arch and the surrounding areas, however they may require additional tests to rule out other disorders. If you have arch pain, it is advised that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can diagnose the condition and discuss correct treatment techniques with you.

A plantar fibroma may disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM of Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Plantar Fibroma

A plantar fibroma is a fibrous knot in the arch of the foot. It is embedded in the plantar fascia which is a band of tissue that extends from the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot. There can be multiple plantar fibromas in the feet at the same time. There are no known causes for this condition. If you have a plantar fibroma, there will be a bump in the arch of your foot that cannot be missed. Any associated pain is most often due to a shoe rubbing against the nodule. Non-surgical options, such as steroid injections, physical therapy, and orthotics should be tried first. Surgery is a last resort and is the only thing that will remove a plantar fibroma entirely. Consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to determine the treatment regimen that is right for you.

What Causes a Plantar Fibroma?

While there are no specific causes identified, a plantar fibroma can possibly come from genetic predisposition or the formation of scar tissue that forms from healing the tears in the plantar fascia.

What Are the Symptoms of a Plantar Fibroma?

There will be a noticeable lump in the arch of the foot that may or may not cause pain. If pain is felt, it is typically because a shoe is rubbing up against the lump or when walking or standing barefoot.

Treatment and Prevention

A plantar fibroma will not disappear without treatment, but it can get smaller and be a non-issue. If pain persists, a podiatrist examines the foot and when the arch of the foot is pressed, pain can be felt down to the toes. An MRI or biopsy might be performed to help diagnose or evaluate the plantar fibroma. The following non-surgical options are generally enough to reduce the size and pain of these nodules:

  • Steroid injections
  • Orthotics
  • Physical therapy to help apply anti-inflammatory creams on the bump 

Surgery is considered if the mass increases in size and the patient continues to feel pain after non-surgical methods are tried.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Tuesday, 05 July 2022 00:00

Uncomfortable Athlete’s Foot

Fungus causes athlete’s foot which is contagious and can be an uncomfortable and unsightly foot condition. Many people get athlete’s foot from warm and moist environments including public swimming pools, shower room floors, and locker rooms. The fungus can enter the feet through small cracks in the skin and can produce red and itchy areas on the feet. It may be more prevalent among people who sweat profusely or those who wear shoes and socks consistently causing the feet to lack air. A common location of athlete’s foot is between the toes and on the bottom of the feet. Additional symptoms include dry, scaly skin and blisters may develop in severe cases. The toenails are often affected causing toenail fungus. The chances of full recovery can improve when this foot condition is immediately treated. If you have symptoms of athlete’s foot, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat this condition.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM from Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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