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Review Dyker Height Foot & Ankle, Brooklyn, NY
Tuesday, 04 October 2022 00:00

One of the more common congenital foot conditions is known as clubfoot. It develops while the baby is in utero and cannot be treated until birth. The tendons that connect the heels to the leg muscles are too short, and this may result in clubfoot. Research has indicated it affects males more than females, and it can be seen in approximately one out of 1,000 births in the United States. It is beneficial that treatment begins early in the baby’s life, preferably within two weeks of birth. The type of treatment can range from using manual manipulation that may help to move the feet into a normal position, to possibly having surgery performed. In many cases, the child can begin regular sports activities when of age after the preferred method of treatment. Common signs of clubfoot include the foot turning in and downward, with the toes pointing toward the opposite foot. Additionally, the affected foot, heel, and calf muscles may be smaller than the other foot, but the foot may straighten out as the healing process occurs. If you would like more information about clubfoot, please confer with a podiatrist who can answer any questions you may have and address your concerns.

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM of Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 27 September 2022 00:00

A healthy child has healthy feet, and so it is critical for parents to be aware of foot afflictions that may negatively impact their child’s feet. One of these conditions is known as intoeing, or pigeon toes, which occurs when a child’s toes point inwards. Intoeing can be present in infants from birth, as a result of twisted foot contortions within the uterus. Pigeon toes can also develop later in childhood, most likely due to movement of the tibia. In many cases, a child’s intoeing may actually correct itself over a period of time. However, if the condition persists and interferes with the child’s walking ability, then specific treatment options may be needed. These might include a surgical procedure or a variety of casts to correct the abnormality. If you are concerned about your child’s intoeing, please make an appointment with a trusted podiatrist today.


 

Making sure that your children maintain good foot health is very important as they grow. If you have any questions, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM of Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

Having healthy feet during childhood can help prevent medical problems later in life, namely in the back and legs. As children grow, their feet require different types of care. Here are some things to consider...

Although babies do not walk yet, it is still very important to take care of their feet.

Avoid putting tight shoes or socks on his or her feet.

Allow the baby to stretch and kick his or her feet to feel comfortable.

As a toddler, kids are now on the move and begin to develop differently. At this age, toddlers are getting a feel for walking, so don’t be alarmed if your toddler is unsteady or ‘walks funny’. 

As your child gets older, it is important to teach them how to take care of their feet.

Show them proper hygiene to prevent infections such as fungus.

Be watchful for any pain or injury.

Have all injuries checked by a doctor as soon as possible.

Comfortable, protective shoes should always be worn, especially at play.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 20 September 2022 00:00

Many runners hear a lot about overpronation and its effects. Some pronation is relatively normal when your foot bears weight as you walk or run. The arch flattens out and the foot rotates inward. The degree to which the foot pronates is different for each runner. Overpronation can affect other body parts, such as the knee and calf, and the sole. How can you tell if you overpronate? Stand on one foot in front of a mirror. Notice whether your ankle wobbles and if your foot rolls in or out. The more it rolls in the more your inner arch touches the floor, and the more your foot pronates. To help remedy overpronation, look for running shoes that offer medial arch support and a wider heel. Additionally, several exercises can help to strengthen ankle and foot muscles, providing more stability. For more information on overpronation, please consult a podiatrist who can assess your gait and provide treatment options that may include custom orthotics.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM from Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 13 September 2022 00:00

A blister is a fluid-filled bubble that forms on the skin. The fluid can be clear or contain blood. If blisters develop between the toes, it can cause pain, particularly the longer one spends on their feet. The two main types of blisters on or between the toes are those from friction and those not due to friction. Friction or pinch blisters are more common and result from toes repeatedly rubbing against each other or against the shoe lining, irritating the skin. These are related to the shape and alignment of toes, fit of shoe, and usually form near the tip of the toe or by the base of the toe.  Sweaty toes are more apt to lead to friction blisters. Blisters not due to friction can develop from an infection (like athlete’s foot), a skin condition, a sunburn, or an allergy. Both types of blisters might look the same. However, the location of the blister and what causes it can help determine the type. Non-friction blisters should be evaluated by a podiatrist. With both types of blisters, good foot hygiene can help prevent them. Popping or picking at blisters should be avoided as broken skin can attract bacteria, which can cause an infection. If you have a blister on or between your toes and you are not sure of the cause, it appears infected, or if it is not healing well, contact a podiatrist for an evaluation and treatment options.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Corinne R. Kauderer, DPM of Dyker Heights Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brooklyn, NY and Old Bridge, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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